Wednesday, January 09, 2013 | Valley Football
Bohl Takes Another Top Coaching Honor

NASHVILLE, Tenn.—The American Football Coaches Association capped its 2013 convention by presenting its top coaching award — AFCA Coach of the Year — to five outstanding coaches on Tuesday, Jan. 8.

The winners will be honored Tuesday evening at the AFCA Coach of the Year Dinner at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center.
Notre Dame’s Brian Kelly, North Dakota State’s Craig Bohl, Valdosta State’s David Dean, St. Thomas’ Glenn Caruso and Morningside’s Steve Ryan are the 2012 AFCA National Coach of the Year winners. Kelly in FBS, Bohl in FCS, Dean in Division II, Caruso in Division III and Ryan in NAIA.

Bohl is the fourth NDSU to earn AFCA Coach of the Year honors. He joins Don Morton (1983), Earle Solomonson (1986) and two-time winner Rocky Hager (1988 and 1990), who each received the Division II award.

In 2012, Bohl led the Bison to a 14-1 record, a second straight Missouri Valley Football Conference title and a second straight FCS national championship. In his 10 years at North Dakota State, Bohl owns a 89-32 record, and those 89 victories place him second on the school’s all-time wins list. He earned the Eddie Robinson Award in 2012, AFCA FCS Regional Coach of the Year honors in 2011, and was named Missouri Valley Football Conference Coach of the Year in 2011 and 2012. 

The winners are selected by a vote of the Active AFCA members (coaches at four-year schools) in the Association’s five divisions. The AFCA has named a Coach of the Year since 1935. The AFCA Coach of the Year award is the oldest and most prestigious of all the Coach of the Year awards and is the only one chosen exclusively by the coaches themselves.

Brian Kelly led Notre Dame to a 12-1 record and an appearance in the BCS National Championship game. He has a 199-68-2 overall record in his 22 seasons as head coach, with two Division II National Championships in 2002-03 at Grand Valley State, two Big East titles at Cincinnati and two AFCA Division II Coach of the Year honors in 2002-03. In his three seasons as head coach for the Fighting Irish, Kelly has led Notre Dame to 28-11 record.

David Dean led the Blazers to a 12-2 record in 2012 and the program’s third NCAA Division II national title in nine years, earning him AFCA Division II Coach of the Year honors for the second time. With those 12 wins, Dean brought his overall record to 54-17 and drew closer to Chris Hatcher’s program leading 76-win mark. He also earned AFCA Regional Coach of the Year honors in 2010 after leading Valdosta State to eight wins, a NCAA Division II playoff berth and the school’s first conference title in six years.

Glenn Caruso led St. Thomas to a 14-1 record, its third consecutive Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) championship and its first appearance in the NCAA Division III national championship game. Caruso has a five-year record of 57-8 at St. Thomas. The Tommies have recorded three straight 10-0 regular seasons, making the first time that has been accomplished in MIAC history. Caruso earned AFCA Regional honors in 2010 after leading St. Thomas to a 12-1 mark and a trip to the NCAA Division III quarterfinals.

Steve Ryan led Morningside to a 13-1 record and an appearance in the NAIA national championship game this season to earn AFCA NAIA National Coach of the Year honors for the first time, to go along with a second straight AFCA Regional Coach of the Year honor. Ryan has an overall record of 98-31 in his 11 years as head coach at Morningside, ranking him second on the school’s all-time wins list behind Jason Saunderson with 118. He guided the Mustangs to a second straight Great Plains Athletic Conference title in 2012, and third under his tutelage. Morningside has made nine straight appearances in the NAIA playoffs under Ryan. 

AFCF Grants
The full-time assistant coaches at the five schools represented by the AFCA National Coach of the Year winners will each receive a $1,000 grant from the American Football Coaches Foundation that can be used to further their education or professional development.

Award History
Lynn “Pappy” Waldorf, then of North¬western, was named as the first AFCA Coach of the Year in 1935. One national winner was selected from 1935 through 1959.  From 1960 through 1982, two national winners were selected — one representing the University Division and one from the College Division. From 1983-2005, four national winners were chosen.  In 2006, the AFCA started honoring an NAIA Coach of the Year, giving us the five honorees we have today.   Prior to 2006, the NAIA was a part of the AFCA’s Division II membership category.

Oldest Award
The AFCA’s Coach of the Year award is the oldest of all Coach of the Year awards and is one of only two Coach of the Year awards recognized by the NCAA in Football Bowl Subdivision and the only Coach of the Year award recognized in the NCAA’s three other divisions.
The NCAA does not select a “coach of the year” for college football. When a coach is referred to as “NCAA Coach of the Year,” he is usually the AFCA Coach of the Year winner.

All-Time Winners: A total of 152 men representing 109 institutions have been honored by the AFCA as AFCA National Coach of the Year since the program was established in 1935.

First Year Coach of the Year: Richmond’s Mike London and Valdosta State’s David Dean are the only coaches to earn AFCA National Coach of the Year honors in their first season as a head coach. Dean was the Division II winner in 2007. London was the FCS winner in 2008.

Most Schools: Jim Tressel is the only coach to win AFCA National Coach of the Year honors at two different schools, and the second to win the honor in two different divisions. Tressel earned AFCA honors at Division I-A Ohio State in 2002 and Division I-AA Youngstown State in 1991 and 1994.

Two Divisions: Brian Kelly is the second coach to win AFCA National Coach of the Year honors in two different divisions. He earned AFCA honors at Division II Grand Valley State in 2002 and 2003, and FBS Notre Dame in 2012.

Top Individuals: Larry Kehres of Mount Union is the only coach in AFCA history to win National Coach of the Year honors nine times. He has earned the award in Mount Union’s national championship seasons of 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2006 and 2008. Joe Paterno of Penn State earned his Division I-A fifth National Coach of the Year Award in 2005 (1968-72-82-86). Wisconsin-Whitewater’s Lance Leipold (2007, 2009-10-11) joins Northwest Missouri State’s Mel Tjeerdsma (1998-99-2008-09) and Bob Reade of Augustana (Ill.) College as the only four-time AFCA Coach of the Year winners. Reade earned the honor in 1983-84-85-86 in College Division II (now Division III). Notre Dame’s Brian Kelly (2002-03, 2012), Carroll’s Mike Van Diest (2003, 2007, 2010), Sioux Falls’ Kalen DeBoer (2006, 2008-09), Appalachian State’s Jerry Moore (2005-06-07), Youngstown State and Ohio State coach Jim Tressel (1991, 1994, 2003), Alabama’s Bear Bryant (1961, 1971, 1973) and North Alabama’s Bobby Wallace (1993-94-95) are the only three-time Coach of the Year winners. Kehres, Leipold, Moore, Reade and Wallace are the only coaches to win the award in three or more consecutive seasons.

Top Schools: Mount Union is the only institution to have a representative win the AFCA National Coach of the Year Award nine times. Georgia Southern, North Dakota State, Penn State and Wisconsin-Whitewater are the only schools with five winners. Alabama, Augustana (Ill.), Grand Valley State, Michigan, Northwest Missouri State, Ohio State and Wittenberg are four-time winners.
Larry Kehres has won all nine awards for Mount Union, while Joe Paterno has won all five awards for Penn State. Paul Johnson (1999, 2000), Erk Russell (1986, 1989) and Tim Stowers (1990) are Georgia Southern’s honorees. North Dakota State’s national winners are Don Morton (1983), Earle Solomonson (1986), Rocky Hager (1988, 1990) and Craig Bohl (2012). Lance Leipold’s four honors and Bob Berezowitz’s 2005 National Coach of the Year award account for Wisconsin-Whitewater’s five honors. Mel Tjeerdsma accounts for all of Northwest Missouri’s awards. Lloyd Carr (1997), Fritz Crisler (1947), Bennie Oosterbaan (1948) and Bo Schembechler (1969) are Michigan’s winners. Bill Edwards (1962, 1963) and Dave Maurer (1973, 1975), his successor, are responsible for Wittenberg being listed in the select group. Gene Stallings earned Coach of the Year honors in 1992 to join three-time winner Bear Bryant as Alabama’s winners. Augustana’s Reade accounts for all of his school’s awards. Ohio State’s Jim Tressel joins Carroll Widdoes (1944), Woody  Hayes (1957) and Earle Bruce (1979) as one of the four Buckeye coaches to win the award. Chuck Martin (2005-06) joins Brian Kelly (2002-03) as the winners from Grand Valley State.

Appalachian State (Jerry More, 2005-06-07), Delaware (Tubby Raymond, 1971-72; K.C. Keeler, 2010), Furman (Dick Sheridan, 1985; Jimmy Satterfield, 1988; Bobby Johnson, 2001), North Alabama (Bobby Wallace, 1993-94-95), Notre Dame (Frank Leahy, 1941; Ara Parseghian, 1964; Brian Kelly, 2012), Sioux Falls (Kalen DeBoer 2006, 2008-09), USC (John McKay, 1962, 1972; Pete Carroll, 2003) and Valdosta State (Chris Hatcher, 2004; David Dean, 2007, 2012) are all in the exclusive group of schools having three winners each. 

Two-Timers: Jim Butterfield, Ithaca (1988, 1991), David Dean, Bill Edwards, Joe Glenn, Northern Colorado (1996-97), Rocky Hager, Paul Johnson, Chuck Martin, Dave Maurer, John McKay, Harold “Tubby” Raymond, Darrell Royal, Texas (1963, 1970), Erk Russell and Andy Talley, Villanova (1997, 2009) are the repeat winners.

Back-to-Back: Kalen DeBoer, Bill Edwards, Joe Glenn, Paul Johnson, Larry Kehres, Brian Kelly, Lance Leipold, Chuck Martin, Jerry Moore, Tubby Raymond, Bob Reade, Mel Tjeerdsma and Bobby Wallace are the only coaches to win national honors in consecutive years. No FBS coach has won the award in consecutive years. Kehres is the only coach to win three consecutive Coach of the Year awards twice, while Tjeerdsma is the only coach to win two consecutive Coach of the Year awards twice.

Fit to be Tied: In 2003, Brian Kelly and Mike Van Diest became the fourth duo in the history of the AFCA National Coach of the Year award to finish in a tie for the honor and the first non-I-A coaches to share the award. Larry Coker and Ralph Friedgen finished in a tie for the honor in 2001. In 1964, Frank Broyles of Arkansas and Ara Parseghian of Notre Dame shared the award and in 1970, Charlie McClendon of Louisiana State and Darrell Royal of Texas were co-winners.

AFCA Coach of the Year Bios

Football Bowl Subdivision
Brian Kelly, University of Notre Dame
First AFCA FBS National Coach of the Year Award ... Led the Fighting Irish to a 12-1 record and an appearance in the BCS National Championship game this season ... Has a 199-68-2 overall record in his 22 years as a head coach at Notre Dame, Cincinnati, Central Michigan and Grand Valley State ... His 12 wins in the 2012 season mark the best season for the Fighting Irish since 1988 ... Guided Cincinnati to a 34-6 record in his three years with two Big East titles and earned three Big East Coach of the Year honors from 2007-09 ... Spent three seasons at Central Michigan with a 19-16 overall mark, leading the Chippewas to a 9-4 mark and a Mid-American Conference title in 2006 ... Head Coach at Grand Valley State for 13 years, leading the Lakers to a 118-35-2 record and two NCAA Division II National Championships in 2002 and 2003 ... Has led three different FBS teams to seven straight bowl games since 2006 ... Earned an overall record of 34-6 in three years as head coach at Cincinnati, leading the Bearcats to three bowl games, including two BCS bowl games.
Previous National Coach of the Year Honors: Division II, Grand Valley St., 2002, 2003
Previous Regional Coach of the Year Honors: Division II, Grand Valley St., Region 3, 1998, 2001; FBS, Cincinnati, Region 1, 2008-09; Notre Dame, Region 3, 2012

Football Championship Subdivision
Craig Bohl, North Dakota State University
First AFCA FCS National Coach of the Year Award ... Led the Bison to a 14-1 record, a second straight Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC) title and a second straight NCAA Football Championship Subdivision national championship this season ... In 10 years at North Dakota State, Bohl’s owns an 89-32 overall record ... Has guided the Bison to a 24-8 record against FCS ranked teams, and a 10-1 mark in the FCS playoffs ... North Dakota State has been ranked in the Top 5 for 42 weeks since moving to FCS in 2004, including 23 weeks at No. 1 ... Led the Bison to a Great West Football Conference title in 2006, and a 10-1 overall record in the program’s third year in FCS play ... Earned MVFC Coach of the Year honors for a second time in 2012, along with being named the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year.
Previous Regional Coach of the Year Honors: FCS, Region 4, 2011

Division II
David Dean, Valdosta State University
Second AFCA Division II National Coach of the Year Award ... Led the Blazers to their third NCAA Division II national title in nine years, and second under Dean in 2012 ... Has a 54-17 overall record at Valdosta State, which places him second on the school’s all-times wins list ... Led Valdosta State to a 8-3 mark, the Gulf South Conference title and a berth in the Division II playoffs in 2010, earning him AFCA Regional Coach of the Year honors for the first time ... Earned AFCA Division II Coach of the Year honors in 2007 after leading the Blazers to a 13-1 record and a national championship in his first season as a head coach.
Previous National Coach of the Year Honors: Division II, 2007
Previous Regional Coach of the Year Honors: Division II, Region 2, 2010

Division III
Glenn Caruso, University of St. Thomas
First AFCA Division III National Coach of the Year Award ... Led the Tommies to a 14-1 record, its third consecutive Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship and its first NCAA Division III championship appearance in the program’s history ... St. Thomas finished No. 2 in the AFCA Division III Coaches’ Top 25 Poll, their highest ranking in school history ... Has a five-year record of 57-8 at St. Thomas, and an overall record of 63-20 including his two seasons at Macalester ... The 14 victories in 2012 tied an MIAC record for most wins in a season ... St. Thomas’ 50 wins in the past four years are the third most in Division III behind only Mount Union (57) and Wisconsin-Whitewater (52).
Previous Regional Coach of the Year Honors: Division III, Region 5, 2010

NAIA
Steve Ryan, Morningside College
First AFCA NAIA National Coach of the Year Award ... Led the Mustangs to a 13-1 record and an appearance in the NAIA championship game this season ... Has an 11-year career record of 98-31 at Morningside ... His 98 victories rank second on the school’s all-time wins list ... Earned AFCA Regional Coach of the Year honors in 2011 when he led the Mustangs to nine wins, the Great Plains Athletic Conference (GPAC) title and a trip to the NAIA playoffs for the eighth straight year ... Morningside has won three GPAC titles under Ryan (2005, 2011-12), and he has been named Conference Coach of the Year four times.
Previous Regional Coach of the Year Honors: Division II, Region 4, 2005; NAIA, Region 4, 2011, 2012

Past AFCA National Coach of the Year Winners

Football Bowl Subdivision
1935 Lynn Waldorf, Northwestern
1936 Dick Harlow, Harvard
1937 Edward E. Mylin, Lafayette
1938 Bill Kern, Carnegie Tech
1939 Dr. Eddie Anderson, Iowa
1940 Clark Shaughnessy, Stanford
1941 Frank Leahy, Notre Dame
1942 Bill Alexander, Georgia Tech
1943 Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pacific
1944 Carroll Widdoes, Ohio St.
1945 Bo McMillin, Indiana
1946 Red Blaik, Army
1947 Fritz Crisler, Michigan
1948 Bennie Oosterbaan, Michigan
1949 Bud Wilkinson, Oklahoma
1950 Charles Caldwell, Princeton
1951 Charles Taylor, Stanford
1952 Biggie Munn, Michigan St.
1953 James Tatum, Maryland
1954 Red Sanders, UCLA
1955 Duffy Daugherty, Michigan St.
1956 Bowden Wyatt, Tennessee
1957 Woody Hayes, Ohio St.
1958 Paul Dietzel, Louisiana St.
1959 Ben Schwartzwalder, Syracuse
1960 Murray Warmath, Minnesota
1961 Paul “Bear” Bryant, Alabama
1962 John McKay, USC
1963 Darrell Royal, Texas
1964 Frank Broyles, Arkansas
Ara Parseghian, Notre Dame (tie)
1965 Tommy Prothro, UCLA
1966 Tom Cahill, Army
1967 John Pont, Indiana
1968 Joe Paterno, Penn St.
1969 Bo Schembechler, Michigan
1970 Charlie McClendon, LSU
Darrell Royal, Texas (tie)
1971 Paul “Bear” Bryant, Alabama
1972 John McKay, USC
1973 Paul “Bear” Bryant, Alabama
1974 Grant Teaff, Baylor
1975 Frank Kush, Arizona St.
1976 Johnny Majors, Pittsburgh
1977 Don James, Washington
1978 Joe Paterno, Penn St.
1979 Earle Bruce, Ohio St.
1980 Vince Dooley, Georgia
1981 Danny Ford, Clemson
1982 Joe Paterno, Penn St.
1983 Ken Hatfield, Air Force
1984 LaVell Edwards, Brigham Young
1985 Fisher DeBerry, Air Force
1986 Joe Paterno, Penn St.
1987 Dick MacPherson, Syracuse
1988 Don Nehlen, West Virginia
1989 Bill McCartney, Colorado
1990 Bobby Ross, Georgia Tech
1991 Bill Lewis, East Carolina
1992 Gene Stallings, Alabama
1993 Barry Alvarez, Wisconsin
1994 Tom Osborne, Nebraska
1995 Gary Barnett, Northwestern
1996 Bruce Snyder, Arizona St.
1997 Lloyd Carr, Michigan
1998 Phil Fulmer, Tennessee
1999 Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech
2000 Bob Stoops, Oklahoma
2001 Larry Coker, Miami (Fla.)
Ralph Friedgen, Maryland (tie)
2002 Jim Tressel, Ohio St.
2003 Pete Carroll, USC
2004 Tommy Tuberville, Auburn
2005 Joe Paterno, Penn St.
2006 Jim Grobe, Wake Forest
2007 Mark Mangino, Kansas
2008 Kyle Whittingham, Utah
2009 Gary Patterson, TCU
2010 Chip Kelly, Oregon
2011 Les Miles, LSU

Football Championship Subdivision
1983 Rey Dempsey, Southern Illinois
1984 Dave Arnold, Montana St.
1985 Dick Sheridan, Furman
1986 Erk Russell, Georgia Southern
1987 Mark Duffner, Holy Cross
1988 Jimmy Satterfield, Furman
1989 Erk Russell, Georgia Southern
1990 Tim Stowers, Georgia Southern
1991 Jim Tressel, Youngstown St.
1992 Charlie Taaffe, The Citadel
1993 Dan Allen, Boston University
1994 Jim Tressel, Youngstown St.
1995 Don Read, Montana
1996 Ray Tellier, Columbia
1997 Andy Talley, Villanova
1998 Mark Whipple, Massachusetts
1999 Paul Johnson, Georgia Southern
2000 Paul Johnson, Georgia Southern
2001 Bobby Johnson, Furman
2002 Jack Harbaugh, Western Kentucky
2003 Dick Biddle, Colgate
2004 Mickey Matthews, James Madison
2005 Jerry Moore, Appalachian St.
2006 Jerry Moore, Appalachian St.
2007 Jerry Moore, Appalachian St.
2008 Mike London, Richmond
2009 Andy Talley, Villanova
2010 K.C. Keeler, Delaware
2011 Willie Fritz, Sam Houston St.

Division II
1983 Don Morton, North Dakota St.
1984 Chan Gailey, Troy St.
1985 George Landis, Bloomsburg
1986 Earle Solomonson, North Dakota St.
1987 Rick Rhoades, Troy St.
1988 Rocky Hager, North Dakota St.
1989 John Williams, Mississippi College
1990 Rocky Hager, North Dakota St.
1991 Chuck Broyles, Pittsburg St.
1992 Bill Burgess, Jacksonville St.
1993 Bobby Wallace, North Alabama
1994 Bobby Wallace, North Alabama
1995 Bobby Wallace, North Alabama
1996 Joe Glenn, Northern Colorado
1997 Joe Glenn, Northern Colorado
1998 Mel Tjeerdsma, Northwest Mo. St.
1999 Mel Tjeerdsma, Northwest Mo. St.
2000 Danny Hale, Bloomsburg
2001 Dale Lennon, North Dakota
2002 Brian Kelly, Grand Valley St.
2003 Brian Kelly, Grand Valley St.
Mike Van Diest, Carroll (Mont.) (tie)
2004 Chris Hatcher, Valdosta St.
2005 Chuck Martin, Grand Valley St.
2006 Chuck Martin, Grand Valley St.
2007 David Dean, Valdosta St.
2008 Mel Tjeerdsma, Northwest Mo. St.
2009 Mel Tjeerdsma, Northwest Mo. St.
2010 Bob Nielson, Minnesota-Duluth
2011 Paul Winters, Wayne St. (Mich.)

Division III
1983 Bob Reade, Augustana (Ill.)
1984 Bob Reade, Augustana (Ill.)
1985 Bob Reade, Augustana (Ill.)
1986 Bob Reade, Augustana (Ill.)
1987 Walt Hameline, Wagner
1988 Jim Butterfield, Ithaca
1989 Mike Kelly, Dayton
1990 Ken O’Keefe, Allegheny
1991 Jim Butterfield, Ithaca
1992 John Luckhardt, Wash. & Jeff.
1993 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
1994 Pete Schmidt, Albion
1995 Roger Harring, Wis.-La Crosse
1996 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
1997 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
1998 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
1999 Frosty Westering, Pacific Lutheran
2000 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
2001 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
2002 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
2003 John Gagliardi, St. John’s (Minn.)
2004 Jay Locey, Linfield
2005 Bob Berezowitz, Wis.-Whitewater
2006 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
2007 Lance Leipold, Wis.-Whitewater
2008 Larry Kehres, Mount Union
2009 Lance Leipold, Wis.-Whitewater
2010 Lance Leipold, Wis.-Whitewater
2011 Lance Leipold, Wis.-Whitewater

NAIA
2006 Kalen DeBoer, Sioux Falls
2007 Mike Van Diest, Carroll (Mont.)
2008 Kalen DeBoer, Sioux Falls
2009 Kalen DeBoer, Sioux Falls
2010 Mike Van Diest, Carroll (Mont.)
2011 Mike Feminis, Saint Xavier

College Division
1960 Warren Woodson, New Mexico St.
1961 Alonzo S. Gaither, Florida A&M
1962 William M. Edwards, Wittenberg
1963 William M. Edwards, Wittenberg
1964 Clarence Stasavich, East Carolina
1965 Jack Curtice, UC-Santa Barbara
1966 Dan Jessee, Trinity College
1967 A.C. Moore, UT-Chattanooga
1968 Jim Root, New Hampshire
1969 Larry Naviaux, Boston University
1970 Bennie Ellender, Arkansas St.
1971 Tubby Raymond, Delaware
1972 Tubby Raymond, Delaware
1973 Dave Maurer, Wittenberg
1974 Roy Kramer, Central Michigan
1975 Dave Maurer, Wittenberg
1976 Jim Dennison, Akron
1977 Bill Manlove, Widener
1978 Lee Tressel, Baldwin-Wallace
1979 Bill Narduzzi, Youngstown St.
1980 Rick Carter, Dayton
1981 Vito Ragazzo, Shippensburg St.
1982 Jim Wacker, Southwest Texas St.